The city of Paris is comprised of 20 arrondissements municipaux or administrative districts, or simply referred to as “arrondissements.” These Parisian neighborhoods are organized in the form of a clockwise spiral pattern, which is often likened to a snail shell. The arrangement starts from the center of the city and ends in the east.

These arrondissements are not to be confused with departmental arrondissements, which have to do with the administrative divisions of France. 

20 Arrondissements of Paris Map

arrondissements of Paris map

From the French arrondir, which means “make round,” the word “arrondissement,” when applied to Paris, almost always means its municipal arrondissements. 

These administrative divisions date back to the French Revolution when authorities decided to arrange Paris into 12 arrondissements in 1795. Paris expanded from a small town centered on the Islands, requiring more administrative and new districts.

So 65 years later, the city integrated parts of its suburbs, adding 8 new arrondissements. This occurred during the time of the reconstruction of Paris under Baron Haussmann. The now 20 arrondissements make up the “Paris’ snail.”

Each of these 20 Paris districts has a Mairie or town hall and a mayor or Maire, and elected officials, et cetera. All 20 of them, however, are still under the rule of the city and the mayor of Paris.

Here’s a guide to help you better understand the 20 arrondissements of Paris and see which of them is best for you.

Other Names for Paris Arrondissements

Paris arrondissements have other names and you might encounter locals who use the abbreviations, the historical name, or even the French name. You might also see these names in written documents. In case it does happen, here’s our cheat sheet for Arrondissements of Paris.

Arrondissement Abbreviations Name French
1st Arrondissement 1re (1ère) Louvre Première (I)
2nd Arrondissement 2e (2ème) Bourse Deuxième (II)
3rd Arrondissement 3e (3ème) Temple Troisième (III)
4th Arrondissement 4e (4ème) Hôtel de Ville Quartrième (IV)
5th Arrondissement 5e (5ème) Panthéon Cinquième (V)
6th Arrondissement 6e (6ème) Luxembourg Sixième (VI)
7th Arrondissement 7e (7ème) Palais-Bourbon Septième (VII)
8th Arrondissement 8e (8ème) Élysée Huitième (VIII)
9th Arrondissement 9e (9ème) Opéra Neuvième (IX)
10th Arrondissement 10e (10ème) Entrepôt Dixième (X)
11th Arrondissement 11e (11ème) Popincourt Onzième (XI)
12th Arrondissement 12e (12ème) Reuilly Douzième (XII)
13th Arrondissement 13e (13ème) Gobelins Treizième (XIII)
14th Arrondissement 14e (14ème) Observatoire Quatorzième (XIV)
15th Arrondissement 15e (15ème) Vaugirard Quinzième (XV)
16th Arrondissement 16e (16ème) Passy Seizième (XVI)
17th Arrondissement 17e (17ème) Batignolles-Monceau Dix-septième (XVII)
18th Arrondissement 18e (18ème) Butte-Montmartre Dix-huitième (XVIII)
19th Arrondissement 19e (19ème) Buttes-Chaumont Dix-neuvième (XIX)
20th Arrondissement 20e (20ème) Ménilmontant Vingtième (XX)

Paris Arrondissements Attractions and Highlights

The best places to visit in Paris are located in different arrondissements. If you are unsure where to stay, you can use this guide to find out which area to stay.

Arrondissement Top Attractions/ Highlights
1st Arrondissement Louvre Museum, St. Eustache Cathedral, the Tuileries Gardens, Palais Royal
2nd Arrondissement Paris Opéra, the historic Bourse de Paris (Paris Stock Exchange), Le Grand Rex, Tour Jean-sans-Peur or Tower of John the Fearless, Opéra Comique, Passage des Panoramas
3rd Arrondissement Le Marais, Musée Picasso, Musée des Arts et Métiers, Marché des Enfants Rouge
4th Arrondissement Paris City Hall, Place des Vosges, Centre Pompidou, and the Gothic Notre-Dame Cathedral.
5th Arrondissement Panthéon building, Jardin des Plantes botanical gardens and the National Museum of Natural History
6th Arrondissement Jardin du Luxembourg, Abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Brasserie Lipp, Les Deux Magots, le Procope, and Café de Flore, and the Brasserie Lipp.
7th Arrondissement Palais Bourbon, Eiffel Tower, Champs de Mars Park, Chapel of Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal, Les Invalides armory museum, Musée d’Orsay, Musée du quai Branly, and Musée Rodin
8th Arrondissement Grand Palais, Élysée Palace, Hotel de Crillon, Place de la Concorde, Parc Monceau and Arc de Triomphe
9th Arrondissement Palais Garnier, Pigalle, Galeries Lafayette, Printemps, Théatre de Paris, Folies Bergères, and Théatre Mogador.
10th Arrondissement Gare du Nord, Gare de l’Est, Canal Saint-Martin, Place de la Republique Square and Rue Sainte-Marthe
11th Arrondissement Église Saint-Ambroise, Cirque d’hiver, Musée du Fumeur, Musée Édith Piaf, Place de la Bastille
12th Arrondissement French Ministry of Finances, Opéra de la Bastille, Faubourg Saint-Antoine, Bois de Vincennes, Jardin du Bassin de l’Arsenal, Musée des Arts Forains, Cimetière de Picpus, and Zoo de Vincennes
13th Arrondissement Bibliothèque Nationale de France, Tour Super-Italie, Gobelins Manufactory
14th Arrondissement Paris Observatory, Catacombes de Paris (Paris Catacombs), Montparnasse Cemetery, Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson, Musée Lenine
15th Arrondissement Tour Montparnasse, Paris Expo Porte de Versailles, Font de Seine, Musée Bourdelle, Parc André Citroën, Church of Notre-Dame de la Salette
16th Arrondissement Jardin d’Acclimatation, Japanese Garden of the Buddhist Pavilion, Parc Sainte-Périne, and Bagatelle Park, a part of the Arc de Triomphe, Place d’Iéna, the Place du Trocadéro, Fondation Louis Vuitton and Palais Tokyo
17th Arrondissement Parc Monceau and Musée national Jean-Jacques Henner
18th Arrondissement La Butte Montmartre, Sacré Cœur, Moulin Rouge
19th Arrondissement Parc des Buttes Chaumont, the Parc de la Villette, Cité de la Musique, Cité des Sciences et de l’Industrie
20th Arrondissement Père Lachaise Cemetery

20 Arrondissements of Paris Guide

1st Arrondissement

Located in the heart of the old city of Paris, the 1st arrondissement is also known as Louvre, after the Louvre Museum. This district also features the St. Eustache Cathedral, the Tuileries Gardens, the 17th-century Palais Royal, and boulevards from the Hausmann era. 

Luxury jewelers and designer boutiques abound along the very chic Rue Saint Honoré and Place Vendôme. Les Halles is known for its international fashion chains along Rue de Rivoli, the Canopée, and a vast underground mall. 

Domaine National du Palais-Royal
Palais-Royal

2nd Arrondissement

The 2nd arrondissement, Bourse, is on the right bank of the River Seine.

A primarily business district, Bourse is home to the Paris Opéra, the historic Bourse de Paris (Paris Stock Exchange), and the largest movie theater in Paris called Le Grand Rex. Here you can also find the notorious Tour Jean-sans-Peur or Tower of John the Fearless, a fortified tower from the medieval period, where a brutal assassination once happened. 

The 2nd Parisian district also houses the Opéra Comique, one of Paris’ classic old theatres; and Passage des Panoramas, which is ideal for a stroll or shopping spree.

Opéra Comique
Opéra Comique

3rd Arrondissement

Also known as Temple and Haut-Marais or Northern Marais, the 3rd arrondissement is where you can find the northern, quieter part of Le Marais, a medieval district of Paris shared with the 4th arrondissement. 

Haut-Marais arrondissement houses 9 museums, including the Musée Picasso and the favorite among science history buffs—Musée des Arts et Métiers. 

Another top attraction is the lively Marché des Enfants Rouge, the oldest covered market in Paris, which is mostly frequented for its international food stalls. 

Musée Picasso
Musée Picasso

4th Arrondissement

The 4th arrondissement is also known as Hôtel-de-Ville, known for its quaint little streets, shops, and cafés. This district is home to the Renaissance-era Paris City Hall and the grassy Place des Vosges, a modern art museum called Centre Pompidou, and the Gothic Notre-Dame Cathedral.

Also contained in the 4th arrondissement is the lively southern part of Le Marais, which is known for its gay bars, galleries, and trendy boutiques.

Notre-Dame Cathedral Paris
Notre-Dame Cathedral

5th Arrondissement

Known as Panthéon, the 5th arrondissement is found on the left bank of the River Seine. This arrondissement is also called the Latin Quarter, for the district dominated by universities and colleges, including the Sorbonne University. That is why this arrondissement is noted for its bookshops, as well as student bars and cafés.

This district houses the Panthéon building, where the remains of notables like Voltaire, Victor Hugo, Émile Zola, and Marie Curie are buried.

The Jardin des Plantes botanical gardens and the National Museum of Natural History are also located here.  

Pantheon of Paris
Panthéon

6th Arrondissement

Luxembourg, the 6th arrondissement, is on the left bank of the River Seine. This district is dominated by the Jardin du Luxembourg, one of the most popular parks in Paris.

The 6th arrondissement is home to posh restaurants and boutiques, and the 6th-century Abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés, the oldest church in Paris. 

The Boulevard Saint-Germain attracts literature buffs, thanks to its various bookstores and publishing houses. It is also famous for its iconic cafés including the Brasserie Lipp, Les Deux Magots, le Procope, and Café de Flore, and the Brasserie Lipp.

The Luxembourg arrondissement is noted for being home to French intellectuals. Its many art galleries and fashion stores make this district one of the most fashionable as well as most expensive areas in Paris.

Luxembourg Gardens
Jardin du Luxembourg

7th Arrondissement

The 7th arrondissement, called Palais Bourbon, is home to the meeting place of the National Assembly—the Palais Bourbon. It also houses some of the most famous tourist attractions of Paris including the Eiffel Tower, Champs de Mars Park, Chapel of Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal, and  Napoleon’s resting place at Les Invalides armory museum. 

World-famous museums such as Musée d’Orsay, Musée du quai Branly, and Musée Rodin are also situated in this district.

The 7th Arrondissement of Paris is a very affluent district, located on the Rive Gauche or the left bank of the River Seine. The historical aristocratic neighborhood of Faubourg Saint-Germain is part of this arrondissement. A favorite home of the French upper class, it also houses various foreign diplomatic embassies.

eiffel tower
Eiffel Tower

8th Arrondissement

The 8th arrondissement, called Élysée, is a very chic district is marked out by the Avenue des Champs Elysées. Located on the right bank of the River Seine, it extends to the iconic Arc de Triomphe and the Place de la Concorde. It is one of Paris’ major business districts.

This arrondissement is home to art museums, including the Grand Palais, which holds a lot of high-profile exhibitions. Élysée Palace, the official residence of the President of France, is also found here. 

Other places of interests include the Hotel de Crillon, Place de la Concorde, Parc Monceau, and of course, the famous shopping destinations for French fashion luxury brands in Avenue Montaigne and Rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré.

Arc de Triomphe
Arc de Triomphe

9th Arrondissement

Found on the right bank of the River Seine, the 9th arrondissement, called Opéra, is the location for various places of cultural, historical, and architectural interest.

The Opéra arrondissement is home to the Palais Garnier, which was built for the Paris Opera from 1861 to 1875 at Emperor Napoleon III’s orders. This famous opera house is nicknamed the “wedding cake” for its domed roof and detailed architecture.

Pigalle, the well-known neon-lit red-light district, offers an eclectic nightlife experience, while the Galeries Lafayette and Printemps are havens for shoppers. The 9th arrondissement also houses numerous theaters, the most notable ones being Théatre de Paris, Folies Bergères, and Théatre Mogador.

10th Arrondissement

Situated on the right bank of the River Seine, the 10th arrondissement is called Entrepôt, or “warehouse” in English. However, because of its large Turkish minority, this district is often referred to as “La Petite Turquie” or Little Turkey.

This arrondissement is the location of the Gare du Nord and the Gare de l’Est, two of Paris’ six main railway stations. These train stations are among the busiest in Europe. 

A huge part of the Canal Saint-Martin is within the 10th arrondissement. Bohemian cafés, as well as Indian restaurants, abound along the famous Parisian canal. 

There are trendy bars and restaurants around Place de la Republique square. But if you want somewhere quiet with global restos and art studios, then Rue Sainte-Marthe is the place to go. 

Gare du Nord
Gare du Nord

11th Arrondissement

For partygoers, the 11th arrondissement is a good option. This is a diverse district with lively bars around Rue Oberkampf and nearby streets. 

Called Popincourt, this urban district is one of the most heavily-populated, not just in France but in all of Europe. Église Saint-Ambroise, Cirque d’hiver, Musée du Fumeur, and Musée Édith Piaf are among places of interest.

For shopping and dining, head to Rue de Charonne, between the République and Nation squares. For a taste of history, the Place de la Bastille lies in the east, after which you may sample what those trendy bars around the place offer. Families will enjoy the markets and children’s parks along Boulevard Richard-Lenoir.

église saint-ambroise
Eglise Saint-Ambroise

12th Arrondissement

The 12th arrondissement is called Reuilly. This is home to the French Ministry of Finances and the AccorHotels Arena.

This arrondissement is mostly residential, but it houses the second-largest opera house in Paris called the Opéra de la Bastille.

Other notable places of interest include the Faubourg Saint-Antoine, Bois de Vincennes, Jardin du Bassin de l’Arsenal, Musée des Arts Forains, Cimetière de Picpus, and Zoo de Vincennes.

Opéra Bastille
Opéra Bastille

13th Arrondissement

The 13th arrondissement is known as Gobelins—or locally, la petite Asie (English: “Little Asia”), since this is Paris’ main Asian district. Gobelins arrondissement has a lot of Chinese and Vietnamese business establishments. 

The 13th arrondissement is home to the Bibliothèque Nationale de France, the national library which is set within book-shaped towers. Also located in the district is the Tour Super-Italie, one of the highest towers in France. The historic tapestry factory called the Gobelins Manufactory is worth a visit as well.

Richelieu Library
Bibliothèque Nationale de France

14th Arrondissement

The 14th arrondissement’s official name is arrondissement de l’Observatoire, which means “arrondissement of the Observatory,” referring to the Paris Observatory. 

This arrondissement is known for the Catacombes de Paris (Paris Catacombs), as well as the Montparnasse Cemetery, the resting place of many notables like Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre.

Fans of contemporary art can visit Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson. The Musée Lenine, a museum dedicated to Vladimir Lenin, is also found in the 14th arrondissement.

Catacombs of Paris
Catacombes de Paris

15th Arrondissement

The 15th arrondissement is one of the quietest sections in Paris, the majority of which is relatively unfrequented by tourists. The district is mostly residential with quaint shops around La Motte-Picquet Grenelle train station.

The arrondissement is called Vaugirard, after Rue de Vaugirard, a very long street that stretches through the district. This is home to the Tour Montparnasse, the highest skyscraper in Paris. 

The Vaugirard arrondissement is also the location of the exhibition and convention center, Paris Expo Porte de Versailles, as well as the Font de Seine.

Other places of interest include the Musée Bourdelle, Parc André Citroën, Church of Notre-Dame de la Salette, and the replica of the statue of Liberty on the île aux Cygnes, a small man-made island on the River Seine.

Tour Montparnasse
Tour Montparnasse

16th Arrondissement

Known for its large green spaces, the 16th arrondissement is teeming with gardens and parks. These include the Jardin d’Acclimatation, Japanese Garden of the Buddhist Pavilion, Parc Sainte-Périne, and Bagatelle Park. 

The arrondissement holds part of the Arc de Triomphe, with a lot of notable museums between the Place d’Iéna and the Place du Trocadéro. Two of the most popular of these museums are the Fondation Louis Vuitton and Palais Tokyo. It also houses the Roland Garros Stadium, where the French Open major tennis tournaments are held.

The 16th arrondissement is among the most opulent areas of Paris.

Parc Sainte-Périne

17th Arrondissement

The 17th arrondissement, known as Batignolles-Monceau, is on the right bank of the River Seine. This arrondissement attracts bohemian crowds with its narrow streets brimming with shops, trendy wine bars, and restaurants. 

Tourists head to the Parc Monceau and Musée national Jean-Jacques Henner, but as it lies a bit off the beaten path, no major sights are there to see. But this is real Paris at its best, so that is reason enough to pay this arrondissement a visit. On a side note, the architecture is pretty amazing in this area. 

Parc Monceau paris
Parc Monceau

18th Arrondissement

The 18th arrondissement is known as Butte-Montmartre, centered around La Butte Montmartre (English: hillock of Montmartre). This used to be an artists’ village where Amedeo Modigliani, Salvador Dali, Georges Braque, and Pablo Picasso once lived in. It is more famous, however, for the splendid hilltop basilica—the Sacré Cœur.

Below the hillock is the iconic Moulin Rouge cabaret, which attracts tourists and nightclub-goers. 

The 18th arrondissement is also home to the African district of Goutte d’Or. The place is known for the marché Barbès, a market where you can find different items from Africa.

Basilique du Sacré-Cœur
Sacré Cœur

19th Arrondissement

The 19th arrondissement, called Butte-Chaumont, is crossed by two canals—the Canal Saint-Denis and the Canal de l’Ourcq. This arrondissement houses the hilltop Parc des Buttes Chaumont and the Parc de la Villette which are some of the best parks and gardens in Paris. 

The Parc de la Villette houses some of the best attractions in the district. Among these are the Cité de la Musique, a group of institutions devoted to music, and the very distinguished music school, Conservatoire de Paris. Also located here is the museum and exhibition center called the Cité des Sciences et de l’Industrie.

If you get tired of waterfalls and city views, the Cent Quatre on Parc des Buttes Chaumont regularly holds contemporary art exhibitions.

parc des buttes-chaumont
Parc des Buttes Chaumont

20th Arrondissement

Also known as Ménilmontant, the 20th arrondissement is home to Ménilmontant and Belleville, two of the city’s cosmopolitan districts. 

Belleville is filled with street art, contemporary art galleries, and low-end Chinese restaurants, while Ménilmontant is noted for music bars.

The 20th arrondissement is also famous for the Père Lachaise Cemetery, a sprawling 44-hectare park, and an open-air museum in one. It is Paris’ first garden cemetery and France’s largest burial ground, where the remains of notables like Eugène Delacroix, Honoré de Balzac, Oscar Wilde, Sarah Bernhardt, Marcel Proust, and Maria Callas are buried. The Père Lachaise Cemetery is also the resting place of Jim Morrison.

Père Lachaise Cemetery
Père Lachaise Cemetery

 

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